All Fired Up: Texan Wildfire Sparked by Self-Incinerating Wind Turbine

The number of wildfires sparked by these things grows by the day. Contrary to their ‘super-safe’, ‘clean’, ‘green’ image, giant industrial wind turbines are the perfect incendiary device.

Around the world, hundreds have exploded into in palls of smoke and balls of flame – in the process – each one raining molten metal and over 1,000 litres of flaming gear oil and hydraulic fluid (see our post here) and burning plastic earthwards.

Wind turbine fires are ten times more common than the wind industry and its parasites claim (see our post here and check out this website: http://turbinesonfire.org).

The wind industry has been forced to concede that at least 4 bushfires were started by wind turbines in Australia, so far:

  • Ten Mile Lagoon in Western Australia in the mid-1990s;
  • Lake Bonney, Millicent (SA) in January 2006 (see the photo below);
  • Cathedral Rocks Wind Farm, Port Lincoln (SA) in February 2009 (see The Advertiser article below); and
  • Starfish Hill (SA) in November 2010 (see this link for more detail).

With more and even larger wind turbines being speared into Australia’s rural communities, catastrophic bushfires are inevitable.

The picture above comes from our recent report on one sparked by a self-incinerating turbine in Washington State. This time it’s Texans getting a taste of their ‘inevitable transition’ to a wind powered future!

Wind turbine blamed for Rhodes Ranch 3 Fire in Mulberry Canyon south of Merkel
Alilene Reporter News
Laura Gutschke
27 August 2019

A motor on a wind turbine caught fire and is blamed for sparking a wildfire Monday in Mulberry Canyon in southwest Taylor County that has burned about 250 acres.

The Texas A&M Forest Service was called about 6:30 p.m. Monday to assist several volunteer fire departments to fight the wildfire northwest of the intersection of FM 89 and County Road 351. The area is about 26 miles southwest of Abilene.

By Tuesday afternoon, the fire was 60 percent contained, according to the forest service website. No structures have been burned, said forest service spokeswoman Mary Leathers.

Fighting the fire is a challenge because of the “very rough” terrain near the wind turbine that had caught fire, she said. Monday’s record temperatures, which reached 109 in Abilene, acerbated the firefighters’ efforts.

“The fire’s up on those ridge lines, and then it burned down into a little bowl, a little canyon area,” Leathers said. “So, that’s why it’s kind of tedious work getting there because there are some areas where the bulldozers can’t get so we’re having to look at natural features to hold the fire.”

First on the scene was the Mulberry Canyon Volunteer Fire Department, Leathers said. Additional VFD personnel and resources were sent from Elm Creek Citizens Association, View, Blackwell, Merkel and Nolan. Taylor County Precinct 1 personnel also have assisted, the View VFD reported in a social media post.

Aerial attacks on the fire Monday evening included a heavy tanker and single-engine airplane spreading fire retardant and a helicopter dropping water on hot spots. Two other forest service airplanes also were in the area to provide aerial supervision and lead the heavy tanker, Leathers said.

Dozers and graders were being used to build containment lines, and brush truck and engine crews monitored the area for hot spots and the fire breaking over the lines.

The forest service expects to stay at the fire site until it is 100 percent contained, Leathers said.

“We’re hoping to get some rain on it. That would help us greatly,” Leathers said.

The forest service has named the incidence the Rhodes Ranch 3 Fire because of two previous fires in the area, Leathers said.

According to Reporter-News files, a 2009 fire in Mulberry Canyon burned for several days and scorched more than 2,000 acres.
Reporter News

Wind turbine safety claims gutted (again)!!

About stopthesethings

We are a group of citizens concerned about the rapid spread of industrial wind power generation installations across Australia.

Comments

  1. Albert Rogers says:

    This is rather a large CO₂ release to be charged against this alleged way of fighting the danger of CO₂-induced Drastic Climate Change.
    Only civilian nuclear power can do that, it doesn’t kill birds, bats, or even with one exceedingly stupid exception, humans.(Chernobyl, 28 near-immediate fatalities, fewer than 100 others)
    The fossil carbon combustion industry knows that it defeated solar “renewable energy” of the sunshine, biomass, and even wind varieties more than a century ago.
    But Électricité de France contrived NOT to be dependent upon coal from their adjacent recent enemy, by using civilian nuclear.
    Somehow the anti-nuclear forces have had some propaganda success in France. Quel dommage!

  2. Reblogged this on ajmarciniak.

  3. lothar W. Meyer says:

    Look, the main danger are the well distributed ashes after burning: the small carbon fibres of a few micrometer length are resulting and will be respired into the lung, with bad consequences like asbestos for all living animals and human.Stopp such nonsens Prof Lothar W. Meyer, Germany

  4. Peter Pronczak says:
  5. I am very concerned about the possibility of fire if the the proposed Chevelon Butte wind farm project by Spower in Arizona south of Winslow were built as it butts up against the Apache-Sitgreaves forest and there is no fire response close by. In 2002 the Rodeo-Chediski fire decimated 468,638 acres. It burned from June 18th to it’s final containment on July 7 and that was in the forest below close to fire response starting on Indian Tribal lands below Heber-Overgaard. It cost $43 million in fossil fuel based green energy $$. Since wind farms are basically energy sucking mechanisms they should not be built at Chevelon Butte for reasons that include fire threat of pristine National Forests and red flashing light blight.

    • It’s an era where an autistic child is seen as a green prophet, dictates what to do to the masses and is about to get a Nobel peace prize for this! What can one say?

  6. Reblogged this on Climate- Science.press.

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