Into The Black: Calm Weather Leaves Britain’s Power Grid At Risk Of Total Collapse

Boris Johnson reckons wind power’s the future for Britain. If so, it’s a future that will soon resemble England’s bitter Dark Ages.

The UK has already had its taste of mass blackouts thanks to sudden and unpredictable collapses in wind power output. Now, as Brits head into winter, it’s a case of much more of the same.

A bout of calm weather has Britain’s grid managers begging for reliable power from, you guessed it, those same fossil fuel-powered sources that Boris claims he’ll soon replace entirely by corralling the British Isles with thousands more of these things.

Blackouts fear forces power alarm at National Grid
The Times
Emily Gosden
4 November 2020

National Grid last night sent out an urgent call for more power stations to fire up to keep Britain’s lights on today after plant outages and low wind farm output increased the risk of blackouts.

The electricity system operator issued an “margin notice”, its most serious security of supply alert in four years, warning of a supply crunch between 4:30pm and 6:30pm today.

It forecast a shortfall of 740 megawatts, or 1.5 per cent, compared with the power plant capacity it wants to have available to meet demand and to provide back-up in case plants break down.

Sources said the operator was in talks for coal-fired power stations to fire up to provide back-up. EDF confirmed it had been asked to warm up its West Burton A plant in Nottinghamshire.

National Grid said the margin notice “highlights that we would like a greater safety cushion between power demand and available supply” but “does not signal that blackouts are imminent”.

The alert and the prospect of Britain relying on polluting coal plants to keep the lights on will raise concerns about energy security. All coal plants are due to close by October 2024, while the government recently committed to a renewed push for offshore wind farms.

National Grid said that it was “forecasting tight margins on the electricity system . . . owing to a number of factors, including low renewable output and the availability of generators over periods of the day with higher demand”. It was “exploring measures to make sure there is enough generation available to increase our buffer of capacity”.
The Times

Calm weather strikes again.

About stopthesethings

We are a group of citizens concerned about the rapid spread of industrial wind power generation installations across Australia.

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