California Dreamin’: Unreliable Wind & Solar Force Californians to Rely On Diesel Generators

California ‘dreaming’ ….

 

Let renewable energy zealots and rent seekers anywhere near your power system and prepare for deadly chaos.

Wind and solar ‘powered’ South Australians know what it is to do without power for days on end. Having experienced plenty of load shedding lasting for 5 hours or more, South Australians got a real taste of the dark ages in September 2016, when the whole State went black.

sudden collapse in wind power output during a vigourous spring storm (wind turbines automatically shut down in high winds) delivered what’s known as a ‘system black’.

The response was to set up 276 MW worth of diesel-fuelled jet engines that cost taxpayers a cool $550m. When the sun sets and calm weather sets in, that part of SA’s ‘inevitable transition’ to wind and solar chew up 80,000 litres of diesel every hour, pumping out an extra 216 tonnes of the dreaded CO2 gas, along with a host of real environmental nasties, as this article – ‘Estimation of carbon footprints from diesel generator emissions’ – points out:

[D]iesel engines release many hazardous air contaminants and greenhouse gases (GHG) including particulate matter (diesel soot and aerosols), carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxides of nitrogen. Particulate matters are largely elemental and organic carbon soot, coated by gaseous organic substances such as formaldehyde and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are highly toxic. In 2001, the mortality due to diesel soot exposure was at least 14,400 people out of 82 million people living in Germany.

Like South Australia, California has been transfixed with a ludicrous attempt to run on sunshine and breezes. Like South Australia, Californians will end up running on diesel generators when demand crunches hit this summer.

California Will Use Diesel This Summer to Help Keep Lights On
Watts Up With That
Charles Rotter
13 June 2020

From Bloomberg

In a hilarious bit of irony:

California will allow PG&E Corp. to use diesel-powered mobile generators to keep some electricity flowing when the utility proactively cuts power to prevent live wires from sparking fires in high wind.

State regulators signed off Thursday on PG&E’s plan to use about 450 megawatts of diesel generation to power homes, businesses, hospitals and other critical facilities as part of the utility’s effort to reduce disruptions during the shutoffs.

After decades of neglect to both its electrical distribution and forest management, the tinderbox, known as California, continues to amuse.

Of course, the virtue-signaling must continue.

PG&E said it considered more environmentally-friendly options but they proved too costly or impractical to deploy in time this year. The company said its mobile generators can use fuel made from vegetable oil and that it will continue to explore cleaner alternatives for the coming years.

Full article can be found here.
Watts Up With That?

Californian reality!

About stopthesethings

We are a group of citizens concerned about the rapid spread of industrial wind power generation installations across Australia.

Comments

  1. Peter Pronczak says:

    Making electricity weather dependent is against all that technological advancement has stood for. An analogy would be the poem The House That Jack Built. Had the storage of the initiating product problem been logically addressed, things would not have become the mess they did. Although it did produce some jobs along the way.
    Much like the Milton Friedman 1960s Indian canal visit STT quoted 2020/05/11, “…give them spoons.”

    Not only is reliance on renwables foolish and wasteful, they require independent backup systems, an additional cost to inefficiency. Much like having to continually test and replace military ordinance.

    The Queensland committee report on the Forest Wind Farm Development Bill 2020 has been released and seems ‘a bit iffy’ on the democracy of the process. As ScoMo ruled out “forcing” nuclear energy on a community, this appears to have taken the opposite approach; including three years of secret government-private company ‘negotiations’.
    Instigating the committee inquiry was kept (un)fairly secret too.

    California reminds of what happened in Tasmania, they lowered the hydro reserves to make money from selling power to the mainland and the inter connector broke (Basslink 2015, 2018, 2019, etc). They had to spend the profit on diesel generators until eventually the cable was repaired by the Italian contractor.
    But on the bright side, there’s plenty of jet engines stored in the Mohave Desert.

  2. Reblogged this on ajmarciniak and commented:
    Let renewable energy zealots and rent seekers anywhere near your power system and prepare for deadly chaos.

    Wind and solar ‘powered’ South Australians know what it is to do without power for days on end. Having experienced plenty of load shedding lasting for 5 hours or more, South Australians got a real taste of the dark ages in September 2016, when the whole State went black.

    A sudden collapse in wind power output during a vigourous spring storm (wind turbines automatically shut down in high winds) delivered what’s known as a ‘system black’.

    The response was to set up 276 MW worth of diesel-fuelled jet engines that cost taxpayers a cool $550m. When the sun sets and calm weather sets in, that part of SA’s ‘inevitable transition’ to wind and solar chew up 80,000 litres of diesel every hour, pumping out an extra 216 tonnes of the dreaded CO2 gas, along with a host of real environmental nasties, as this article – ‘Estimation of carbon footprints from diesel generator emissions’ – points out:

  3. Reblogged this on uwerolandgross.

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