Wind Power is Built on Mountains of Coal & a Sea of Oil

coalminevn

Where wind turbines really come from.

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The wind-worshipper rails at sites like ours, screaming – in a kind of hopeful hex – that we’re backed by BIG Oil and BIG Coal and will, accordingly, rot in hell for our temerity in challenging their infantile world view.

Maybe we will bunk-up down below in the next life, but that’ll be due to more enjoyable sins, than spending our days pointing out the insanity of trying to rely on a medieval power source, that was ditched Centuries ago, for fairly obvious reasons.

Armed with a mirror, and a little common sense, the wind cult would see that it is, in fact, the wind industry that exists, and only exists, thanks to mountains of coal, oil and gas – as this little wrap up neatly points out.

To Get Wind Power You Need Oil
IEEE Spectrum
Vaclav Smil
29 February 2016

Wind turbines are the most visible symbols of the quest for renewable electricity generation. And yet, although they exploit the wind, which is as free and as green as energy can be, the machines themselves are pure embodiments of fossil fuels.

Large trucks bring steel and other raw materials to the site, earth-moving equipment beats a path to otherwise inaccessible high ground, large cranes erect the structures, and all these machines burn diesel fuel. So do the freight trains and cargo ships that convey the materials needed for the production of cement, steel, and plastics.

For a 5-megawatt turbine, the steel alone averages [pdf] 150 metric tons for the reinforced concrete foundations, 250 metric tons for the rotor hubs and nacelles (which house the gearbox and generator), and 500 metric tons for the towers.

If wind-generated electricity were to supply 25 percent of global demand by 2030 (forecast [pdf] to reach about 30 petawatt-hours), then even with a high average capacity factor of 35 percent, the aggregate installed wind power of about 2.5 terawatts would require roughly 450 million metric tons of steel. And that’s without counting the metal for towers, wires, and transformers for the new high-voltage transmission links that would be needed to connect it all to the grid.

A lot of energy goes into making steel. Sintered or pelletized iron ore is smelted in blast furnaces, charged with coke made from coal, and receives infusions of powdered coal and natural gas. Pig iron is decarbonized in basic oxygen furnaces. Then steel goes through continuous casting processes (which turn molten steel directly into the rough shape of the final product). Steel used in turbine construction embodies typically about 35 gigajoules per metric ton.

To make the steel required for wind turbines that might operate by 2030, you’d need fossil fuels equivalent to more than 600 million metric tons of coal.

A 5-MW turbine has three roughly 60-meter-long airfoils, each weighing about 15 metric tons. They have light balsa or foam cores and outer laminations made mostly from glass-fiber-reinforced epoxy or polyester resins. The glass is made by melting silicon dioxide and other mineral oxides in furnaces fired by natural gas. The resins begin with ethylene derived from light hydrocarbons, most commonly the products of naphtha cracking, liquefied petroleum gas, or the ethane in natural gas.

The final fiber-reinforced composite embodies on the order of 170 GJ/t. Therefore, to get 2.5 TW of installed wind power by 2030, we would need an aggregate rotor mass of about 23 million metric tons, incorporating the equivalent of about 90 million metric tons of crude oil. And when all is in place, the entire structure must be waterproofed with resins whose synthesis starts with ethylene. Another required oil product is lubricant, for the turbine gearboxes, which has to be changed periodically during the machine’s two-decade lifetime.

Undoubtedly, a well-sited and well-built wind turbine would generate as much energy as it embodies in less than a year. However, all of it will be in the form of intermittent electricity—while its production, installation, and maintenance remain critically dependent on specific fossil energies.

Moreover, for most of these energies—coke for iron-ore smelting, coal and petroleum coke to fuel cement kilns, naphtha and natural gas as feedstock and fuel for the synthesis of plastics and the making of fiberglass, diesel fuel for ships, trucks, and construction machinery, lubricants for gearboxes—we have no nonfossil substitutes that would be readily available on the requisite large commercial scales.

For a long time to come—until all energies used to produce wind turbines and photovoltaic cells come from renewable energy sources—modern civilization will remain fundamentally dependent on fossil fuels.

This article appears in the March 2016 print issue as “What I See When I See a Wind Turbine.”
IEEE Spectrum

steel in turbine

About stopthesethings

We are a group of citizens concerned about the rapid spread of industrial wind power generation installations across Australia.

Comments

  1. Excellent Article STT,

    A little quote I like, not sure where I got it but I like it !!

    Wind gets a pass on everything. Blow up a mountaintop for coal = BAD! Blow up a mountaintop for wind turbines = GOOD!
    Destroy valuable farmland for an oil derrick or to drill for gas = BAD! Destroy valuable farmland for wind = GOOD!
    Toxic waste caused by oil = BAD! Toxic waste caused by the production of wind turbines = GOOD!
    You can’t have it both ways. If something is flawed, (like wind) you can’t ignore that fact just because it erroneously comes under the heading of ‘Green’.

  2. The wind power industry is run by the coal and oil industry. It is a front to appease the greenies. It is a no-brainer that they would do this; back a non-competiter to mask their own activities. Oh, the tangled web the eco-controllers weave.

  3. Geoff McPherson says:

    Worth pointing out that IEEE refers to Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

    Wikipedia at least describes its as “the world’s largest association of technical professionals with more than 400,000 members in chapters around the world. Its objectives are the educational and technical advancement of electrical and electronic engineering, telecommunications, computer engineering and allied disciplines”.

    So IEE is pretty down the line science and engineering. They do not accept ill considered contributions.

  4. Reblogged this on The Law is my Oyster and commented:
    The Green Dream. More dream than green. Convert Moneypoint to biomass, now!

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